9-14 October 2017
Guadalajara, Mexico
Mexico/General timezone
Home > Contribution List
Displaying 53 contributions out of 53
Session: Session XI
on 13 Oct 2017 at 08:30
Session: Session VI
on 11 Oct 2017 at 17:00
Type: Invited Talk Session: Session X
Studying the propagation of charged cosmic rays requires a realistic prescription of the background magnetic field of the traversed environment, such as the Galaxy or the heliosphere. In the latter case, analytic models may provide a less accurate, yet simpler and more accessible alternative to computationally expensive high-resolution magnetofluid simulations. In this talk, I will present and rev ... More
Presented by Dr. Jens KLEIMANN on 12 Oct 2017 at 17:10
Type: Public Lecture Session: Public Lecture II
Advanced LIGO provided humanity with the first direct detection of gravitational waves, just in time for the 100th anniversary of Einstein's prediction. Beyond the discovery, there is a growing focus on incorporating gravitational waves as a new window on the Universe addressing questions from violent cosmic transients to cosmological enigmas. I will discuss some aspects of (i) the instrumental br ... More
Presented by Prof. Marka SZABOLCS on 10 Oct 2017 at 18:00
Session: Session XI
Presented by Prof. Alex LAZARIAN on 13 Oct 2017 at 09:40
Session: Session XI
on 13 Oct 2017 at 09:15
Session: Session VI
on 11 Oct 2017 at 17:50
Type: Invited Talk Session: Session VI
The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) space experiment, which has been developed by Japan in collaboration with Italy and the United States, is a high-energy astroparticle physics mission. The instrument was launched on August 19, 2015 to the ISS with HTV-5 (H-II Transfer Vehicle 5) and installed on the Japanese Experiment Module - Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) on August 25. The primary goals o ... More
Presented by Prof. Shoji TORII on 11 Oct 2017 at 17:25
Session: Session V
Presented by Dr. Gwenael GIACINTI on 11 Oct 2017 at 14:15
Session: Session IV
on 11 Oct 2017 at 12:45
Session: Session I
on 10 Oct 2017 at 09:40
Session: Session IV
Presented by Dr. Carmelo EVOLI on 11 Oct 2017 at 10:45
Session: Session V
on 11 Oct 2017 at 15:05
Session: Session IX
on 12 Oct 2017 at 14:50
Session: Session II
Presented by Lizz WILLS
Type: Invited Talk Session: Session IV
The propagation of charged cosmic rays through the Galactic environment influences all aspects of the observation at Earth. Energy spectrum, composition and anisotropy are changed due to deflections in magnetic fields and interactions with the interstellar medium. Today the transport is simulated with different simulation methods either based on the solution of a transport equation (multi-particle ... More
Presented by Mr. Lukas MERTEN on 11 Oct 2017 at 11:30
Session: Session VIII
Presented by Dr. Mark WIEDENBECK on 12 Oct 2017 at 11:40
Type: Invited Talk Session: Session I
This is a summary of the cosmic ray anisotropy observed with the IceCube Observatory. Comparisons with similar experiments are also shown, along with the future perspectives.
Presented by Paolo DESIATI on 10 Oct 2017 at 09:15
Type: Invited Talk Session: Session II
The ARGO-YBJ experiment has been in stable data taking for more than 5 years at the YangBaJing Cosmic Ray Observatory (Tibet, P.R. China, 4300 m a.s.l., 606 g/cm$^2$). With a duty-cycle greater than 86\% the detector collected about 5$\times$10$^{11}$ events in a wide energy range, from few hundreds GeV up to about 10 PeV. High altitude location and detector features make ARGO-YBJ capable of inves ... More
Presented by Dr. Giuseppe DI SCIASCIO on 10 Oct 2017 at 11:00
Session: Session V
Presented by Dr. Giovanni MORLINO on 11 Oct 2017 at 14:40
Session: Session III
With its high duty cycle and large field of view ($\sim2$ sr), the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory continuously surveys the cosmic ray arrival distribution at very high energies ($100$ GeV $-$ $1$ PeV) in the Northern Sky. Previous measurements by other air shower experiments at the TeV scale reveal energy-dependent angular features of the cosmic-ray anisotropy at both large ( ... More
Presented by Zig HAMPEL-ARIAS on 11 Oct 2017 at 09:50
Session: Session III
on 11 Oct 2017 at 08:50
Type: Invited Talk Session: Session XI
Large area telescope show spatial anisotropies of the high energy cosmic ray flux in the permille. We model the cosmic ray flux through a sphere of 1 kpc, in which we have located different astrosphere (or the like) with a radii varying from 1 to 10\,pc at a large distance from the observer. We discuss cosmic ray anisotropies for different setups of the location of the astrospheres. We will ... More
Presented by Dr. Klaus SCHERER on 13 Oct 2017 at 08:55
Session: Session VI
on 11 Oct 2017 at 16:15
Session: Session X
on 12 Oct 2017 at 18:00
Session: Session II
on 10 Oct 2017 at 12:15
Session: Session VI
on 11 Oct 2017 at 18:15
Session: Session VII
Presented by Justin VANDENBROUCKE on 12 Oct 2017 at 08:30
Session: Session IV
Presented by Justin VANDENBROUCKE on 11 Oct 2017 at 12:20
Type: Invited Talk Session: Session X
In the tail direction of the heliosphere an anisotropy in the cosmic ray flux is observed by the large area telescopes. These ansiotropy is partly explained by the modulation of cosmic rays in the tail region. But, most of the modeling of the large scale heliosphere is concentrated on the nose direction, because there are the in situ observations of the Voayger spacecraft available. The helio ... More
Presented by Dr. Klaus SCHERER on 12 Oct 2017 at 15:35
Session: Session X
Presented by Prof. Ming ZHANG on 12 Oct 2017 at 17:35
Session: Session I
Presented by Segev BENZVI on 10 Oct 2017 at 08:30
Session: Session XII
on 13 Oct 2017 at 11:35
Session: Session VIII
Presented by Priscilla FRISCH on 12 Oct 2017 at 10:30
Type: Invited Talk Session: Session XI
I will review our observational knowledge of the interstellar magnetic field in the Milky Way. I will first describe the main methods traditionally used to probe the interstellar magnetic field, and I will explain what the different methods have taught us regarding its strength, direction, and spatial distribution. I will then describe a new method, known as rotation measure synthesis or Faraday t ... More
Presented by Dr. Katia FERRIERE on 13 Oct 2017 at 10:25
Type: Public Lecture Session: Public Lecture III
Astronomy began with people looking at the night sky to see the visible light from the stars. As technology was developed, they augmented their own eyes with optical telescopes, then radio telescopes, then even launched satellites to detect other wavelengths of light from infrared to UV to x-rays and gamma-rays. Today the study of the stars has branched out to use giant detectors on the earth whic ... More
Presented by Prof. Jordan GOODMAN on 14 Oct 2017 at 11:00
Session: Session III
on 11 Oct 2017 at 09:20
Session: Session X
on 12 Oct 2017 at 16:45
Type: Invited Talk Session: Session II
This talk introduces a new way of exploring Cosmic Ray Anisotropy: observation through secondary neutrinos. Using IceCube and a high-acceptance dataset of atmospheric neutrinos created for this analysis, we are nearing the sensitivity threshold to observe the phenomenon in atmospheric neutrinos arriving from the Northern Hemisphere. This analysis focuses on energy ranges that correspond to the spa ... More
Presented by Lizz WILLS on 10 Oct 2017 at 11:50
Session: Session IX
Presented by Dr. Jonathan SLAVIN on 12 Oct 2017 at 13:35
Type: Public Lecture Session: Public Lecture
En 1912, el físico austriaco Victor Hess descubrió que constantemente estamos siendo bombardeados por partículas provenientes del espacio. Estas partículas son tan energéticas que se presume que están relacionadas con eventos cataclísmicos que suceden incluso fuera de nuestra galaxia. En esta plática hablaremos sobre los rayos cósmicos y como los estudiamos desde México con el observator ... More
Presented by Dr. María Magdalena GONZáLEZ SáNCHEZ on 9 Oct 2017 at 18:00
Type: Invited Talk Session: Session II
The Tibet Air Shower (AS) experiment has successfully observed the sidereal anisotropy of multi-TeV cosmic ray intensity, while the long-term two-hemisphere observations with underground muon detectors in Japan and Australia have reported the sidereal anisotropy of sub-TeV cosmic rays and its solar modulation. The Tibet Air Shower (AS) experiment also succeeded for the first time in observing infl ... More
Presented by Prof. Kazuoki MUNAKATA on 10 Oct 2017 at 11:20
Session: Session VII
on 12 Oct 2017 at 08:55
TBA
Session: Session IV
on 11 Oct 2017 at 11:55
TBA
Session: Session X
on 12 Oct 2017 at 16:20
TBA
Session: Session IX
on 12 Oct 2017 at 14:00
TBA
Session: Session IX
on 12 Oct 2017 at 14:25
TBA
Session: Session XII
on 13 Oct 2017 at 11:10
Type: Invited Talk Session: Session II
Individual observations of the sidereal anisotropy in the arrival direction distribution of Galactic cosmic rays are restricted by limited sky coverage. As a result, the power spectrum of the anisotropy obtained from any one measurement displays a systematic correlation between different multipole modes $C_\ell$. We describe the methods used to combine the IceCube and HAWC data, address the indivi ... More
Presented by Juan Carlos DíAZ VéLEZ on 10 Oct 2017 at 10:35
Session: Session I
Presented by Juan Carlos DíAZ VéLEZ on 10 Oct 2017 at 08:20
Session: Session III
on 11 Oct 2017 at 08:30